Liverpool Skylilne

Natural Sciences and Psychology

Dr Jennifer Sneddon

Dr Jennifer Sneddon

Telephone: 0151 231 2191

Publications

Conference Publication (journal proceedings)

Sneddon JC, Mason A. 2014. Automatic classification of foraging behaviour in sheep using Radio Frequency ID, movement sensor and video technology BSAS Advances in Animal Biosciences, BSAS Advances in Animal Biosciences 5 :16-16

Sneddon J, Mason A. 2014. Automated monitoring of foraging behaviour in free ranging sheep grazing a bio-diverse pasture using audio and video information Proceedings of the International Conference on Sensing Technology, ICST, 2014-January :170-173

mason A, Sneddon . 2013. Automated monitoring of free-range sheep Seventh International Conference Sensing Technology >DOI

Sneddon JC. 1996. Evidence for enhanced physiological mechanisms for rehydration from the gastrointestinal tract in desert-adapted horses JOURNAL OF SPORTS SCIENCES, International Conference on Dehydration, Rehydration and Exercise in the Heat 14 :351-351 >Link

SNEDDON JC, VANDERWALT J, MITCHELL G. 1991. WATER HOMEOSTASIS IN DESERT DWELLING HORSES FIELDING D, PEARSON RA. DONKEYS, MULES AND HORSES IN TROPICAL AGRICULTURAL DEVELOPMENT, COLLOQUIUM ON DONKEYS, MULES AND HORSES IN TROPICAL AGRICULTURAL DEVELOPMENT :97-97 >Link

Sneddon JC. Copper, Molybdenum and selenium in the soil-wool pathway for North Ronaldsay sheep. Is wool an indicator of micronutrient status? British Ecological Society

Walker MSJC. The use of horse hair as a bio-indicator of copper, molybdenum and selenium status in soils grazed on a long term basis. Annual Main Meeting of the British Ecological Society

McNeil CSJC. Lead deposition gradients in shells of Helix aspersa exposed to mineral, atmospheric and anthropogenic sources of lead contamination Comparative Biochemistry & Physiology, Annual Main Meetin of the Society of Experimental Biology 150A

Christian LSJC. An investigation into copper and molybdenum transfer between soil, heather and feather of red grouse (Lagopus lagopus scoticus) Annual Main Meeting of the British Ecological Society

Yon MSJCCRLN. Lead concentrations in earthworms, vegetation and mammal hair in a mixed deciduous shooting copse in Cheshire, England. Annual Main Meeting of the British Ecological Society

Sneddon JCPM. The use of washed sheep wool as a bio-indicator for lead and copper concentration in upland areas of the UK. Comparative Biochemistry & Physiology, Annual Main Meetin of the Society of Experimental Biology 146A :183-183

Sneddon JCRPMDRCSGOCLW. Physiological responses of seasonally anhidrotic horses to exercise Comparative Biochemistry & Physiology, Annual Main Meeting of the Society of Experimental Biology 145 S1A :23-23

Sneddon JC. Seasonal use of vertical hedgerow habitat by small mammals. Don't forget the third dimension! Annual Main Meeting of the British Ecological Society

Sneddon J C WRBA. A simple technique for the estimation of body surface area in horses and ponies. Annual Main Meetin of the Society of Experimental Biology

Raine NMASJC. A simple water-filled plethysmograph for the measurement of blood flow in human limbs. Annual Main Meeting of the Society of Experimental Biology

Sneddon JC. The effects of dehydration and rehydration on plasma vasopressin and aldosterone levels in horses First International Congress of the African Union of Physiological Sciences

Sneddon JC. The effects of dehydration and rehydration on plasma vasopressin and aldosterone levels in horses First International Congress of the African Association of Physiological Sciences

Posters

Sneddon JC, Nuttall AM, Stott T, Warder A. 2010. Long term matching of microclimate and air quality data at fixed points and during routine journeys along the Dee and Mersey estuaries: a tool for education and policy makers Society for Experimental Biology Annual Main Meeting 30th June - 3rd July Prague 2010

Journal Articles

Sneddon JCRRPLN. 2009. Source-pathway-receptor investigation of the fate of trace elements derived from shotgun pellets discharged into terrestrial ecosystems managed for game shooting. Environmental Pollution, 157 :2663-2669

Sneddon JC, Ritruechai P, de Yanés GS, Howard CV. 2008. Seasonal influences on quantitative changes in sweat-associated anatomy in native and thoroughbred horses. Vet Dermatol, 19 :163-173 >DOI >Link

Sneddon JC, Boomker E, Howard CV. 2006. Mucosal surface area and fermentation activity in the hind gut of hydrated and chronically dehydrated working donkeys. J Anim Sci, 84 :119-124 >Link

Pain R, Sneddon JC, Cochrane CA. 2006. In vitro study of the effectiveness of different dressings for debriding fibrin in blood clots from horses. Vet Rec, 159 :712-717 >Link

Sneddon JC HE. 2004. A descriptive study of stress fractures in competitive event horses in the UK Equine and Comparative Exercise Physiology, 1 :233-238

Sneddon JCWRBA. 2004. A simple field technique for estimation of body surface area in horses and ponies Equine and Comparative Exercise Physiology, 1 :51-60

Hatch CSJCJG. 2004. A descriptive study of urban rabies during the civil war in Sierra Leone 1995 - 2001 Tropical Animal Production and Health, 36 :321-324

Raine NM, Sneddon JC. 2002. A simple water-filled plethysmograph for measurement of limb blood flow in humans. Adv Physiol Educ, 26 :120-128 >DOI >Link

Sneddon JCSCTG. 2001. The effects of multimedia delivery and continual assessment on student academic performance on a Level 1 undergraduate plant science module Journal of Biological Education, 36 :6-10

Sneddon JC, Argenzio RA. 1998. Feeding strategy and water homeostasis in equids: the role of the hind gut JOURNAL OF ARID ENVIRONMENTS, 38 :493-509 >DOI >Link

Parker J, Johnston GM, Young LE, Gleed RD, Taylor PM, Waterman AE, Jones RS, Clarke KW, Steffey EP, Gasthuys FMR, Sneddon JC. 1996. Equine anaesthesia: HBLB workshop EQUINE VETERINARY JOURNAL, 28 :10-14 >Link

KRECEK RC, LOUW JP, SNEDDON JC. 1995. PARASITES OF FERAL HORSES FROM THE NAMIB DESERT, NAMIBIA JOURNAL OF THE HELMINTHOLOGICAL SOCIETY OF WASHINGTON, 62 :84-86 >Link

Sneddon JC. 1994. The effect of dehydration and rehydration on plasma vasopressin and aldosterone levels in horses Journal of Physiology, 479 :122-122

Noakes TDGDWGSJCDSCLM. 1994. Oral fluid overload: a proposed mechanism for hyponatremia. Noakes TDGDWGSJCDSLM. Biochemistry of Exercise, 87 :111-111

SNEDDON JC, VANDERWALT J, MITCHELL G. 1994. EFFECTS OF DEHYDRATION AND REHYDRATION ON THE INTRAVASCULAR SPACE IN HORSES JOURNAL OF PHYSIOLOGY-LONDON, 479P :P122-P122 >Link

Sneddon JCKTLG. 1993. Sturdy survivors in the desert Conserva, 8 :15-17

Sneddon JC. 1993. Physiological effects of hypertonic dehydration on body fluid pools in arid-adapted mammals. How do Arab-based horses compare? Comp Biochem Physiol Comp Physiol, 104 :201-213 >Link

Sneddon JC, Van Der Walt J, Mitchell G, Hammer S, Taljaard JJ. 1993. Effects of dehydration and rehydration on plasma vasopressin and aldosterone in horses. Physiol Behav, 54 :223-228 >Link

SNEDDON JC, VANDERWALT J, MITCHELL G. 1993. EFFECT OF DEHYDRATION ON THE VOLUMES OF BODY-FLUID COMPARTMENTS IN HORSES JOURNAL OF ARID ENVIRONMENTS, 24 :397-408 >DOI >Link

Sneddon JC, Van der Walt J, Mitchell G. 1992. Effects of dehydration and rehydration on the intravascular space in horses. Comp Biochem Physiol Comp Physiol, 103 :163-167 >Link

Sneddon JC, van der Walt JG, Mitchell G. 1991. Water homeostasis in desert-dwelling horses. J Appl Physiol (1985), 71 :112-117 >DOI >Link

SNEDDON JC, COLYN P. 1991. A PRACTICAL SYSTEM FOR MEASURING WATER-INTAKE IN STABLED HORSES JOURNAL OF EQUINE VETERINARY SCIENCE, 11 :141-141 >DOI >Link

Sneddon JC. 1990. The interpretation and use of plasma/serum activities of intracellular enzymes in organ specific diseases of horses. South African Veterinary Medicine, 3 :99-102

Sneddon JC. 1989. Pulmonary hypertension in White Leghorn broilers. A pilot trial on physiological indices. South African Journal of Science, 85 :330-330

Sneddon JC. 1989. Physiological responses to submaximal exercise in fit and unfit dogs South African Journal of Science, 84

Sneddon JC. 1989. Cardiovascular adaptations to differenct training intensities in mammals South African Veterinary Medicine, 2 :48-53

Sneddon JC, Minnaar PP, Grosskopf JF, Groeneveld HT. 1989. Physiological and blood biochemical responses to submaximal treadmill exercise in Canaan dogs before, during and after training. J S Afr Vet Assoc, 60 :87-91 >Link

Sneddon JC. 1988. Fitness determination in racehorses - a physiological viewpoint The South African Racehorse, :57-59

Sneddon JC, Sneddon JC. 1986. The effect of slope on the relationship between heart rate and energy expenditure in cattle walking on treadmills. Journal of Agricultural Science (camb.), 106 :433-436

MATHERS JC, SNEDDON JC. 1985. EFFECT OF AMBIENT-TEMPERATURE ON THE ENERGY COSTS OF ACTIVITY BY TROPICAL CATTLE PROCEEDINGS OF THE NUTRITION SOCIETY, 44 :A32-A32 >Link

SNEDDON JC, MATHERS JC, THOMSON CJ. 1985. PREDICTION OF ENERGY-EXPENDITURE FROM HEART-RATE MEASUREMENTS IN EXERCISING CATTLE PROCEEDINGS OF THE NUTRITION SOCIETY, 44 :A33-A33 >Link

Sneddon JC. 1983. Game Farming in Zimbambwe Livestock International, :142-144

Sneddon JC. Water homeostasis in desert dwelling horsess South African Journal of Science, 86 :549-549

Theses / Dissertations

Sneddon JC. 1991. Water Homeostasis on desert dwelling horses Faculty of Veterinary Science, University of Pretoria

Sneddon JC. 1983. The effects of heat and work on cattle walking on treadmills Faculty of Veterinary Science, University of Edinburgh

Performances

Sneddon JCLA. A Workshop on how to conduct a radio interview in colaboration with BBC Radio Scotland

Sneddon JCMS. A Workshop on How to create a press release

Engagement & Impact

External committees:

Committee name: Society for Experimental Biology Plus Committee, Organisation: Society for Experimental Biology, Position: Committee member, URL: http://www.sebiology.org/

Membership of professional bodies:

Conservation Ecology sub committee, The British Ecological Society

The Education & Public Affairs Committee, Society for Experimental Biology, The Society for Experimental Biology

Other invited event:

Title of event: Water Hydration and Health, Location: The Royal Society of Medicine Food and Health Forum, London, Description: Invited presentation: Comparative Physiology: what can we learn from animals?

Title of event: PhD seminar, Location: Nottingham, Description: PhD presentations at a seminar hosted by funding body EBLEXAutomated monitoring of foraging behaviour in sheep presented by student D Spencer

Title of event: Measuring Biodiversity, Location: Lancaster University, Description: Measuring Biodiversity Workshop 16th September 2010 Lancaster Environment Centre ‘ ’ (Magurran 2004). Biodiversity is the variety and abundance of species in a defined unit of study Measuring biodiversity is of course key for formulating policy to protect against biodiversity loss, but is not often considered within the combined contexts of species richness, evenness and density. Policy makers are often interested in change in the rate of change, and whether this is positive or negative. Three guest speakers presented at this Workshop, and informal discussion followed after tea. There were participants from OPAL (Open University & Hedge-link), the Institute for Ecology & Environmental Management, the National Biodiversity Network, the Field Studies Council and the Natural History Museum. Professor Steve Buckland, (Centre for Research into Ecological and Environmental Modelling. St Andrew University) set the scene. Steve presented a synopsis of a key paper (Buckland et al., 2005, Phil. Trans. R. Soc. Lond.) within the context of 2010 target for reducing biodiversity loss by 10%. Key points in the presentation were: why monitor; what should be monitored and how should monitoring be carried out? To address these points, the presentation amalgamated thinking on sampling approach and the features of a robust biodiversity index. A robust index will often be a combination of speciesspecific or survey-specific indices. Always consult a statistician before venturing into the field! Something as simple as the geometric mean can be superior to more complex indices for picking out true long term trends population data & yield the vital information on change in the rate of change. A transfer of approach has to be made from monitoring in a few nonrepresentative pristine sites to monitoring at a variety of representative locations, selected according to some form of random sampling scheme, e.g. a stratified random sample of grid squares. This has been achieved e.g. in the UK Breeding Bird Survey. Achieving this for many taxa, such as invertebrates or reptiles, is more challenging. Linear transects incorporating key habitats within a stratified random sampling grid is one approach. Three main components for a robust index of biodiversity are species richness, evenness and density. A summary of characteristics covered by a good index is summarised in the following 6 points: 1. Species evenness, abundance and density are constant; index should show no trend. 2. Abundance decreasing – index should decrease. 3 .Evenness decreasing –index should decrease. 4. No. of species decreasing – index should decrease. 5. Index should not be a function of sample size 6. It should have good and measureable precision. Lisa Norton (Centre for Ecology & Hydrology, Lancaster) gave a synopsis of the National Countryside Survey (www.countrysidesurvey.org.uk'>www.countrysidesurvey.org.uk). Lisa covered an approach to measuring biodiversity at a National Scale. This national data resource is used heavily by policy makers. It provides the official statistics on stock, condition and change for GB Broad Habitats by surveying the countryside using a randomly stratified sampling design. Lisa covered the sampling methods of the Countryside Survey and their data outputs, spanning three decades of activity. The data – which includes information on habitats, vegetation, soils, headwater streams and latterly ponds is available at www.countrysidesurvey.org.uk'>www.countrysidesurvey.org.uk and can be used for educational purposes. Customised software used during the 2007 survey together with ruggedized computers enabled digital data recording in the field for the first time. The reductions in systematic error and auditable work flows resulted in the most comprehensive and robust data set to date. It was interesting to learn that for the last survey monitoring staff were recruited from Bulgaria in order to reach the full complement of 70 staff that were required for the survey. The staff from Bulgaria had amongst the best botanical skills of all the field survey staff and recruiting sufficient staff from the UK with comparable skills proved difficult. A lack of graduates with taxonomic skills was highlighted in the BBSRC niche skills deficit report published in 2009. Guy Knight (Entomology, Liverpool Museum) gave a timely reminder of the role that museum collections and curators can play as educational resources and sources of taxonomic expertise. Museums undertake consultancy work in monitoring biodiversity, and in managing undergraduate work placements. Jenny Sneddon Liverpool John Moores University

Other Professional Activity:

Describe the Professional Activities: Review for Journals Veterinary Dermatology, Journal of Animal Science (Camb), Physiology & Behaviour.

Describe the Professional Activities: Research Essentials Workshop LJMU 14th May 2013

Research Grants Awarded:

AgResearch, Monitoring the Growth of Fodder Beet using Electromagnetic Wave Sensors, Dr Olga Korostynska and Dr Jenny Sneddon, Grant value (£): 12000, Duration of research project: 6 months

Natural Resources Wales via Small Business Research Initiative (SBRI), Smart Radio Frequency Identification Platform with Acoustic Stimulus for Virtual Fencing Phase 2, Dr Jenny Sneddon, Grant value (£): 45000, Duration of research project: 12 months

Small Business Research Initiative (Technology Startegy Board Wales), Smart Radio Frequency Identification Platform with Acoustic Stimulus for Virtual Fencing Part 2., Alex Mason BLT, LJMU, Grant value (£): 45,000, Duration of research project: 1 year

Small Business REsearch Initiative (TEchnology Strategy Board, Wales), Smart Radio Frequency Identification Platform with Acoustic Stimulus for Virtual fencing, Alex Mason BLT, LJMU, Grant value (£): 20,000, Duration of research project: 6 months

English Beef and Lamb Executive (Agricultural and Horticultural Levy Board), Automated monitoring of foraging behaviour in free ranging sheep grazing biodiverse pasture, Alex Mason BLT, LJMU, Grant value (£): 6000, Duration of research project: 1 year

Teaching qualification:

Title of qualification gained: Post Graduate Certificate of Education