Liverpool Skylilne

Pharmacy and Biomolecular Sciences

Dr Sarah Gordon

Dr Sarah Gordon

Telephone: 0151 231 2069

Biography

Sarah Gordon studied Pharmacy at the University of Otago (New Zealand), and completed her NZ pharmacy registration year in 2006. She then returned to the University of Otago and undertook a PhD investigating the use of thermosensitive chitosan-based hydrogels for the delivery of cancer vaccines. In 2010 she moved to Denmark, where she was employed as a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Copenhagen. During this time, she had the opportunity to work on development of predictive in vitro dissolution/release test methods for oral dosage forms.

In 2013 Sarah relocated to Germany to take up a position as a postdoctoral scientist at the Helmholtz Institute for Pharmaceutical Research Saarland (HIPS), a branch of the Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research. Here Sarah became involved in various projects related to evaluating, tackling and mimicking bacterial mechanisms for regulating anti- infective uptake and efficacy.

Sarah’s employment at Liverpool John Moores University began in November 2016, following her appointment as a Lecturer in Pharmaceutics.

Research Interests
• Nanocarriers for intracellular drug delivery
• Solubility/permeability-enhancing particulate systems for oral drug delivery
• Non-invasive vaccine delivery systems
• The Gram-negative bacterial cell envelope as a biological barrier
• Cell culture and membrane models for oral drug absorption

Publications

Highlighted publications

Menina S, Labouta HI, Geyer R, Krause T, Gordon S, Dersch P, Lehr CM. 2016. Invasin-functionalized liposome nanocarriers improve the intracellular delivery of anti-infective drugs RSC Advances, 6 :41622-41629 >DOI

Graef F, Vukosavljevic B, Michel JP, Wirth M, Ries O, De Rossi C, Windbergs M, Rosilio V, Ducho C, Gordon S, Lehr CM. 2016. The bacterial cell envelope as delimiter of anti-infective bioavailability – An in vitro permeation model of the Gram-negative bacterial inner membrane Journal of Controlled Release, 243 :214-224 >DOI

Gordon S, Teichmann E, Young K, Finnie K, Rades T, Hook S. 2010. In vitro and in vivo investigation of thermosensitive chitosan hydrogels containing silica nanoparticles for vaccine delivery European Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences, 41 :360-368 >DOI

Journal Articles

Murgia X, Yasar H, Carvalho-Wodarz C, Loretz B, Gordon S, Schwarzkopf K, Schaefer U, Lehr CM. 2017. Modelling the bronchial barrier in pulmonary drug delivery: A human bronchial epithelial cell line supplemented with human tracheal mucus European Journal of Pharmaceutics and Biopharmaceutics, 118 :79-88 >DOI

Castoldi A, Herr C, Niederstraßer J, Labouta HI, Melero A, Gordon S, Schneider-Daum N, Bals R, Lehr CM. 2017. Calcifediol-loaded liposomes for local treatment of pulmonary bacterial infections European Journal of Pharmaceutics and Biopharmaceutics, 118 :62-67 >DOI

Menina S, Labouta HI, Geyer R, Krause T, Gordon S, Dersch P, Lehr CM. 2016. Invasin-functionalized liposome nanocarriers improve the intracellular delivery of anti-infective drugs RSC Advances, 6 :41622-41629 >DOI

Graef F, Gordon S, Lehr CM. 2016. Anti-infectives in drug delivery-overcoming the gram-negative bacterial cell envelope Current Topics in Microbiology and Immunology, 398 :475-496 >DOI

Seif S, Graef F, Gordon S, Windbergs M. 2016. Monitoring drug release from electrospun fibers using an in situ fiber-optic system Dissolution Technologies, 23 :6-11 >DOI

Graef F, Vukosavljevic B, Michel JP, Wirth M, Ries O, De Rossi C, Windbergs M, Rosilio V, Ducho C, Gordon S, Lehr CM. 2016. The bacterial cell envelope as delimiter of anti-infective bioavailability – An in vitro permeation model of the Gram-negative bacterial inner membrane Journal of Controlled Release, 243 :214-224 >DOI

Nielsen LH, Nagstrup J, Gordon S, Keller SS, Østergaard J, Rades T, Müllertz A, Boisen A. 2015. pH-triggered drug release from biodegradable microwells for oral drug delivery Biomedical Microdevices, 17 >DOI

Gordon S, Daneshian M, Bouwstra J, Caloni F, Constant S, Davies DE, Dandekar G, Guzman CA, Fabian E, Haltner E, Hartung T, Hasiwa N, Hayden P, Kandarova H, Khare S, Krug HF, Kneuer C, Leist M, Lian G, Marx U, Metzger M, Ott K, Prieto P, Roberts MS, Roggen EL, Tralau T, Van Den Braak C, Walles H, Lehr CM. 2015. Non-animal models of epithelial barriers (skin, intestine and lung) in research, industrial applications and regulatory toxicology Altex, 32 :327-378 >DOI

Labouta HI, Menina S, Kochut A, Gordon S, Geyer R, Dersch P, Lehr CM. 2015. Bacteriomimetic invasin-functionalized nanocarriers for intracellular delivery Journal of Controlled Release, 220 :414-424 >DOI

Gordon S, Naelapää K, Rantanen J, Selen A, Müllertz A, Ostergaard J. 2013. Real-time dissolution behavior of furosemide in biorelevant media as determined by UV imaging Pharmaceutical Development and Technology, 18 :1407-1416 >DOI

Nielsen LH, Gordon S, Pajander JP, Østergaard J, Rades T, Müllertz A. 2013. Biorelevant characterisation of amorphous furosemide salt exhibits conversion to a furosemide hydrate during dissolution International Journal of Pharmaceutics, 457 :14-24 >DOI

Nielsen LH, Gordon S, Holm R, Selen A, Rades T, Müllertz A. 2013. Preparation of an amorphous sodium furosemide salt improves solubility and dissolution rate and leads to a faster Tmax after oral dosing to rats European Journal of Pharmaceutics and Biopharmaceutics, 85 :942-951 >DOI

Gordon S, Young K, Wilson R, Rizwan S, Kemp R, Rades T, Hook S. 2012. Chitosan hydrogels containing liposomes and cubosomes as particulate sustained release vaccine delivery systems Journal of Liposome Research, 22 :193-204 >DOI

Gordon S, Bar-Shalom D. 2011. Easy to swallow? Industrial Pharmacy, :13-15

Gordon S, Teichmann E, Young K, Finnie K, Rades T, Hook S. 2010. In vitro and in vivo investigation of thermosensitive chitosan hydrogels containing silica nanoparticles for vaccine delivery European Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences, 41 :360-368 >DOI

Gordon S, Saupe A, McBurney W, Rades T, Hook S. 2008. Comparison of chitosan nanoparticles and chitosan hydrogels for vaccine delivery Journal of Pharmacy and Pharmacology, 60 :1591-1600 >DOI

Chapters

Gordon S. 2014. Gels as vaccine delivery systems Foged C, Rades T, Perrie Y, Hook S. Subunit Vaccine Delivery Springer 9781493914173

Patents

Lehr CM, Labouta HI , Gordon S, Castoldi A, Menina S, Geyer R, Kochut A, Dersch P. Methods and compositions of carrier systems for the purpose of intracellular drug targeting. International Publication Number WO 2016/024008 A1