Katie Hesketh

Sport and Exercise Sciences

Dr Katie Hesketh is a Post-doc researcher in mobile health technology and exercise. Katie's research interests centre around alternative exercise interventions for those with a sedentary lifestyle and/or with Type 2 diabetes. Katie has a specific focus on the the implementation of exercise interventions in a real-world environment as a nom-pharmacological management strategy to help prevent and treat non-communicable disease.

Previously Katie's area of interest has been the use of home-based high intensity interval training (HIIT) as a way to remove barriers and increase exercise adherence. More recently her projects have involved the use of technology to help support patients through an exercise programme. Although exercise physiology is her main area of research, often her projects involve a multi-disciplinary approach her current projects involve qualitative research, physical activity monitoring, behavioural change techniques and motivational interviewing.

Away from her research Katie is a member of Equality, Diversity and inclusion (EDI) team within the School of Sport & Exercise Sciences and is the Physiological Society Rep at LJMU. She also enjoys time at the swimming pool playing/coaching water polo and was previously the GB women's captain.

Degrees

2020, Liverpool John Moores University, UK, PhD
2016, Liverpool John Moores Univeristy, United Kingdom, MPhil
2015, Liverpool John Moores University, United Kingdom, 1st Class BSc (Hons) Sport and Exercise Science

Academic appointments

Post Doctoral Researcher, Liverpool John Moores University, 2020 - present

Journal article

Srisawat K, Hesketh K, Cocks M, Strauss J, Edwards BJ, Lisboa PJ, Shepherd S, Burniston JG. 2020. Reliability of Protein Abundance and Synthesis Measurements in Human Skeletal Muscle. Proteomics, 20 DOI Author Url Public Url

Hesketh K, Shepherd SO, Strauss JA, Low DA, Cooper RG, Wagenmakers AJM, Cocks M. 2019. Passive Heat Therapy in Sedentary Humans Increases Skeletal Muscle Capillarisation and eNOS Content but Not Mitochondrial Density or GLUT4 Content. American Journal of Physiology: Heart and Circulatory Physiology, 317 :H114-H123 DOI Author Url Public Url

Conference publication

Wagenmakers AJM, Hesketh K, Shepherd SO, Strauss JA, Low DA, Cooper RJ, Cocks M. 2019. Passive Heat Therapy in Sedentary Humans Improves Aerobic Capacity and Insulin Sensitivity via Increases in Skeletal Muscle Capillarisation and eNOS FASEB JOURNAL, Experimental Biology Meeting (EB) 33 Author Url

Thesis/Dissertation

Hesketh KL. THE EFFECT OF INTERMITTENT CYCLE TRAINING TIME AND INTENSITY ON AEROBIC CAPACITY Strauss J, Cocks M, Shepherd S, Wagenmakers A. Public Url

Hesketh K. High intensity interval training: moving away from the laboratory and into the real-world Strauss J, Cocks M, Wagenmakers A, Shepherd S. Public Url

Conference presentation:

Passive heating induces similar benefits in aerobic capacity and insulin sensitivity as moderate-intensity endurance training., 21st Annual Congress of the European College Sport Science, Vienna, Austria, Oral presentation. 2016

Passive heating induces similar benefits in aerobic capacity and insulin sensitivity as moderate-intensity endurance training., British Association of Sport & Exercise Sciences (BASES) Student Conference, Bangor, UK, Oral presentation. 2016

Dark Chocolate: Improving exercise capacity and insulin sensitivity in healthy humans., British Association of Sport & Exercise Sciences (BASES) Student Conference, Liverpool, UK, Oral presentation. 2015

External collaboration:

Liverpool Centre for Cardiovascular Sciences, Dr Ben Buckley.

University of British Columbia, Professor Ali McManus, Dr Jonathan Little, Dr Mary Jung.

University of Exeter, Dr Rob Andrews.

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