Sport and Exercise Science education adds £3.9 billion income to the UK economy



Sport and Exercise Sciences

Results of a new report show that Sport and Exercise Science courses added £3.9 billion in income to the UK economy, with average salaries for SES graduates after six months of employment at £21,100 per annum. Over the course of their careers, SES graduates earn on average £667,000 more compared to their non-graduate peers.

Published today by The Physiological Society and GuildHE, the report also examines the social value of Sport and Exercise Science courses. Graduates and postgraduate researchers demonstrate critical thinking, attention to detail, interdisciplinary working and, in all four nations of the UK, are using these skills during and after their courses to benefit their local communities and the UK as a whole.

The LJMU School of Sport and Exercise Sciences contributed to this study, through its interdisciplinary nature of research and teaching with biomechanists, physiologists and psychologists working closely together to increase lifelong fitness and health in people of all ages and constitutions.  

This included economic impact and social value of SES courses by the staff at LJMU made to the ‘Ageing Society’, with emphasis on 'Healthy Ageing’ both financially and to the quality of life of individuals.

In particular, the Research to Improve Stair Climbing Safety (RISCS) study from LJMU’s Biomechanics Research Group was highlighted as an example from The Physiological Society - demonstrating the strength of the research and research informed education delivered by LJMU.

Professor Dave Richardson is the Director of the School of Sport and Exercise Sciences, commented:

“The School of Sport and Exercise Sciences of LJMU is proud to have been included in this influential report. It is fantastic that our graduates, PhD students and researchers make such an impact on society. The prevention of falls in elderly people, which was one of the highlighted case studies, has a very large financial and social impact on UK society.”

Sport and Exercise Education graphic

Further information and the full report: http://www.physoc.org/sportscience




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