Drama students to perform during Battle of the Atlantic 80th anniversary week



Thirteen second-year Drama students from Liverpool Screen School have, in collaboration with History academics and students from the School of Humanities and Social Science, produced an original show which will be performed during anniversary events across the city in May.

The three free performances will take place on Wednesday 24, Thursday 25 and Friday 26 May at 7.30pm at the John Foster Drama Studio, 22 Hope Street, Liverpool L1 9BY. Tickets can be reserved via Eventbrite.

LJMU is working closely with the Battle of the Atlantic Memorial Trust and the Western Approaches Museum to tell the untold stories of those involved in the battle 80 years on.

Blowing a Raspberry at Hitler: A story of WATU, the WRNS and the War at Sea

Written by the students, Blowing a Raspberry at Hitler: A story of WATU, the WRNS and the War at Sea, is based in part on Simon Parkin’s book A Game of Birds and Wolves. The play tells the story of how victory was ultimately sealed in the Battle of the Atlantic, with military personnel in Liverpool working on intelligence reports, battle reports, planning, directing daily combat, and mapping out the strategy of the war at sea.

Forming part of their second-year studies focus on adaptation, the production was showcased in January with students using feedback and lessons learnt to rework the piece for the commemorations at the end of May. They begin rehearsals for the production at the beginning of May.

The production has also been aided with research conducted by an LJMU undergraduate History student, and a PhD researcher from the University of Portsmouth who travelled to Liverpool to talk to the students about life aboard a Royal Navy destroyer and transatlantic convoys.

Other ways that LJMU will mark the Battle of the Atlantic 80th anniversary

As part of the city’s programme of events, the Centre for Port and Maritime History will host a one-day conference on Saturday 20 May, in association with the Battle of the Atlantic Memorial Trust, considering the history and legacies of the battle 80 years on. Registration is now open for the conference.

Experts from the LJMU Maritime Centre are scoping out an interactive display opportunity with the Western Approaches Museum and other opportunities to celebrate LJMU’s maritime links throughout 2023.

LJMU 200 years of history and heritage – looking back and navigating the future

LJMU has its own unique ties with the maritime history of Liverpool. In 1852 it opened its Nautical School and College, reflecting Liverpool’s status in the 19th century as one of the world’s leading ports.

Since then, LJMU has developed its education and research offer dedicated to the maritime sector, through specialised courses offered at the Faculty of Engineering and Technology, which also houses the LJMU Maritime Centre, connecting industry regionally and internationally to plug future skills gaps.

Maritime ties will be celebrated this year as LJMU marks its own milestone anniversary. Celebrating our bicentenary, always ahead of our time.


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