Liverpool Skylilne

Sport and Exercise Sciences

Dr Richard Foster

Dr Richard Foster

Telephone: 0151 904 6258

Biography

Dr. Richard Foster is a Senior Lecturer in Biomechanics within the School of Sport and Exercise Sciences. He is a member of the Research to Improve Stair Climbing Safety (RISCS) group within the Research Institute for Sport and Exercise Sciences.

Dr. Foster was a Research Assistant in Virtual Rehabilitation (2009-2010) and received his PhD in Virtual Rehabilitation at LJMU in 2012. He then completed a 2-year NIHR Public Health Research funded postdoctorate in Vision and Gait at the University of Bradford (2012-2014), followed by a brief Research Fellow position at the University of Lincoln (2014). Dr. Foster’s next role was as a Lecturer in Biomechanics at Nottingham Trent University (2014-2016) before returning to LJMU.

Dr. Foster previously focused on how the effects of virtual reality game training, aimed at improving control of movement of the trunk and pelvis segments (core) in children with Cerebral Palsy, impacted on activities of daily living.
Dr. Foster’s current research focuses on falls/falls-risk in young and older adults, by investigating the compensatory mechanisms required during overground gait and adaptive gait tasks such as stair negotiation and obstacle crossing. Ongoing research also focuses on the role of vision during these tasks. In addition, Dr. Foster is conducting research centred upon understanding the compensatory mechanisms produced by children with pathology during activities of daily living.

Dr. Foster is a professional member of the International Society of Posture and Gait Research (ISPGR).

Dr. Foster has existing research collaborations with:
- Division of Medical Engineering in the School of Engineering, University of Bradford, UK.
- School of Science and Technology, Nottingham Trent University, UK.

Degrees

2012, Liverpool John Moores University, United Kingdom, PhD
2008, Liverpool John Moores University, United Kingdom, MSc Sports Biomechanics
2007, Liverpool John Moores University, United Kingdom, BSc Sports Science

Publications

Highlighted publications

Foster RJ, Whitaker D, Scally AJ, Buckley JG, Elliott DB. 2015. What You See Is What You Step: The Horizontal-Vertical Illusion Increases Toe Clearance in Older Adults During Stair Ascent INVESTIGATIVE OPHTHALMOLOGY & VISUAL SCIENCE, 56 :2950-2957 >DOI >Link

Foster RJ, Hotchkiss J, Buckley JG, Elliott DB. 2014. Safety on stairs: Influence of a tread edge highlighter and its position EXPERIMENTAL GERONTOLOGY, 55 :152-158 >DOI >Link

Journal Articles

Elliott DB, Hotchkiss J, Scally AJ, Foster R, Buckley JG. 2016. Intermediate addition multifocals provide safe stair ambulation with adequate 'short-term' reading OPHTHALMIC AND PHYSIOLOGICAL OPTICS, 36 :60-68 >DOI >Link

Foster RJ, Buckley JG, Whitaker D, Elliott DB. 2015. The addition of stripes (a version of the ‘horizontal-vertical illusion’) increases foot clearance when crossing low-height obstacles Ergonomics, :1-6 >DOI

Elliott DB, Foster RJ, Whitaker D, Scally AJ, Buckley JG. 2015. Analysis of lower limb movement to determine the effect of manipulating the appearance of stairs to improve safety: a linked series of laboratory-based, repeated measures studies Public Health Research, 3 :1-56 >DOI

Foster RJ, Whitaker D, Scally AJ, Buckley JG, Elliott DB. 2015. What You See Is What You Step: The Horizontal-Vertical Illusion Increases Toe Clearance in Older Adults During Stair Ascent INVESTIGATIVE OPHTHALMOLOGY & VISUAL SCIENCE, 56 :2950-2957 >DOI >Link

Foster RJ, Hotchkiss J, Buckley JG, Elliott DB. 2014. Safety on stairs: Influence of a tread edge highlighter and its position EXPERIMENTAL GERONTOLOGY, 55 :152-158 >DOI >Link

Foster RJ, De Asha AR, Reeves ND, Maganaris CN, Buckley JG. 2014. Stair-specific algorithms for identification of touch-down and foot-off when descending or ascending a non-instrumented staircase Gait and Posture, 39 :816-821 >DOI

Barton GJ, Hawken MB, Foster RJ, Holmes G, Butler PB. 2013. The effects of virtual reality game training on trunk to pelvis coupling in a child with cerebral palsy JOURNAL OF NEUROENGINEERING AND REHABILITATION, 10 >DOI >Link

Barton GJ, Hawken MB, Foster RJ, Holmes G, Butler PB. 2011. Playing the Goblin Post Office game improves movement control of the core: A case study 2011 International Conference on Virtual Rehabilitation, ICVR 2011, >DOI