Browse our repository of public health reports

The Public Health Institute has over 800 published reports generated from external research grants and collaborative projects.

The publications cover a wide range of subjects including our specialist areas of expertise such as substance use, sexual and reproductive health, intelligence and surveillance, international public health, environment and sustainability as well as cross cutting themes such as deprivation and vulnerabilities.

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  1. An Evaluation of The Nurturing Programme for Fathers at HMP Altcourse

    Existing evidence suggests prison-based parenting programmes are promising in improving parenting skills and relationships between parents in prison and their children, but there remains uncertainty on how these interventions can be effectively implemented. In light of this, Merseyside Violence Reduction Partnership (VRP) asked the Public Health Institute at Liverpool John Moores University (LJMU) to evaluate The Nurturing Programme, a parenting intervention at HMP Altcourse, a Category B prison in Liverpool (North West England). The Nurturing Programme is a 10-session parenting programme created by Family Links which aims to help parents and children live emotionally healthy lives, focusing on four main constructs: self-awareness, appropriate expectations, empathy, and positive discipline. During 2022, a family link worker delivered the course the course six times at HMP Altcourse Family Intervention Unit. Each course ran over a five-week period (two sessions per week) for up to 12 men per course. The mixed methods evaluation used interviews with stakeholders (n=3), pre (n=30) and post (n=26) surveys with fathers, interviews with fathers who had completed the programme (n=25) and analysis of secondary data in order to better understand: 1) the implementation of The Nurturing Programme (including barriers and facilitators, fidelity, and reach); 2) participating fathers’ experiences and perceptions of The Nurturing Programme; and, 3) the intended and actual impacts of The Nurturing Programme on fathers, children, and their families.

    Published

    25/01/2024

    Tagged

    Young people and ACEs

    Population health

    Violence and unintentional injury

    Authors

    Jane Harris, Evelyn Hearne, Zara Quigg

    [Hidden]
  2. Merseyside Violence Reduction Partnership whole system evaluation report 2022-23

    Merseyside is one of several areas allocated funding by the Home Office since 2019 to establish a multi-agency violence reduction unit. Merseyside Violence Reduction Partnership (MVRP) aims to take a whole system public health approach to prevention that complements existing multi-agency partnerships and brings together partners to develop a coordinated approach to tackle the root causes of violence. Since 2019, the MVRP has commissioned Liverpool John Moores University and its partners to evaluate the MVRP as a whole and selected work programmes. This report is the fourth annual whole system evaluation of MVRP and aims to examine their implementation, embedding, and sustainability of a public health approach to violence prevention. The primary objectives were 1) To assess the progress that the MVRP has made in implementing different components of a public health approach to violence prevention across the region 2) To review the sustainability of the public health approach to violence prevention across the region. 3) To identify key areas for further transformation, considering progress to date, and the requirements of the UK Serious Violence Duty. Methods: The methodological framework was informed by the whole system approach to public health evaluation (Egan et al, 2019), combining qualitative interviews with members of the MVRP team (n=15) and Steering Group (n=14), five mixed methods case studies of place-based interventions undertaken in each Local Authority area (using qualitative methods and secondary data analysis), and a survey with delivery partners (n=27) to update the MVRP logic model and theory of change.

    Published

    23/01/2024

    Tagged

    Violence and unintentional injury

    Young people and ACEs

    Population health

    Authors

    Zara Quigg, Jane Harris, Evelyn Hearne, Matthew Millings, Chloe Smith, Ann Marie Farrugia, Mwaka Nanyangwe, Hannah Timpson

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  3. Evaluation of the Ariel Trust Violence Reduction Education Programmes in Primary Schools across Merseyside

    In 2022/23 the Merseyside Violence Reduction Partnership (MVRP) funded the development and piloting of a suite of programmes delivered by Ariel Trust, an education charity in Merseyside. Ariel Trust developed three programmes called ‘Send me a Selfie’, ‘Grassing or Grooming’, and ‘Skills to Resist Radicalisation’ and trained teachers to deliver them to primary school children across Merseyside. These programmes used action-based learning theatre and role-play methods to teach primary school aged children about problematic situations, giving them the skills in how to respond appropriately, and ask for help if they are involved, including as a bystander. Liverpool John Moores University were commissioned to evaluate the Ariel Trust violence education programmes in primary schools across Merseyside. By the end of the 2022/2023 academic year, a total of 107 schools across Merseyside had delivered at least one of the programmes and over 6,000 students had taken part in the programmes. Findings from the 2022/23 evaluation of the programmes suggested staff and students’ perceptions of the programme content, and particularly the delivery style were very positive. Critically, the programmes had significant positive impacts on students’ knowledge and attitudes related to the topics covered, including knowledge on how to keep safe online, a strengthened understanding of grassing and grooming concepts, who to reach out to for help, and how to navigate difficult situations. Whilst further research and evaluation is required, findings to date suggest a number of key learnings for programme development, and overall support the continued implementation of the programmes across Merseyside schools in 2023/24.

    Published

    09/01/2024

    Tagged

    Violence and unintentional injury

    Young people and ACEs

    Authors

    Nadia Butler, Ann Marie Farrugia, Charley Wilson, Rebecca Bates, Zara Quigg

    [Hidden]
  4. Merseyside Violence Reduction Partnership Child Adolescent to Parent Violence and Abuse - Literature Review

    Merseyside is one of several areas allocated funding since 2019 by the UK government to establish a Violence Reduction Unit (The Merseyside Violence Reduction Partnership [MVRP]). Since 2022/23, Liverpool John Moores University (LJMU; Quigg) have been commissioned by the MVRP to implement violence prevention evaluation and research to fill gaps in local and (inter)national knowledge. In 2022/23, the MVRP identified a need to enhance understanding of child/adolescent to parent/caregiver violence and abuse (CAPVA), and subsequently implemented a multi-agency event to examine CAPVA across Merseyside. This event highlighted the need for local research on CAPVA, and the MVRP commissioned LJMU to implement a research study bringing together what is currently known about CAPVA, and a PhD work programme to examine what an effective model of preventing and responding to CAPVA would look like for Merseyside. This literature review forms part of the PhD work programme and specifically explores what is known about child/adolescent to parent/caregiver violence and abuse globally in terms of nature and extent, impacts, risk factors, theories and explanations, and policy and practice. The contents of this review would provide useful information for practitioners working with families who are experiencing CAPVA, service providers for those experiencing CAPVA and anybody wanting to expand their knowledge and understanding of CAPVA.

    Published

    08/12/2023

    Tagged

    Violence and unintentional injury

    Young people and ACEs

    Authors

    Chloe Booth, Zara Quigg, Nadia Butler, Ellie McCoy

    [Hidden]
  5. Merseyside Violence Reduction Partnership Child Adolescent to Parent Violence and Abuse (CAPVA) research study 2023

    Child and adolescent to parent violence and abuse (CAPVA) is a form of family abuse where a child uses a range of harmful behaviours towards a parent/caregiver. CAPVA can affect any family from any community and can have devastating impacts on an individual’s life, not only for the parent/caregiver but also for the child/young person. In response to growing awareness and local partner concerns regarding CAPVA, in 2022 the Merseyside Violence Reduction Partnership (MVRP) implemented a multi-agency stakeholder event on CAPVA. The event aimed to raise awareness of CAPVA and share examples of prevention and response approaches, and to facilitate discussions about whether or not further work is needed to ensure local and regional responses to CAPVA meet the needs of children and adolescents and their parents/carers, and the practitioners and multi-agency teams supporting them. Critically, the event highlighted the need to improve understanding of the nature, extent, and impact of CAPVA across Merseyside, current service provision and interventions, and areas for development across the whole system. The MVRP commissioned the Public Health Institute (PHI), Liverpool John Moores University (LJMU) to conduct a research study to enhance understanding of CAPVA, and prevention and response approaches across Merseyside. 

    Published

    08/12/2023

    Tagged

    Violence and unintentional injury

    Young people and ACEs

    Authors

    Rebecca Bates, Chloe Smith, Lorna Porcellato, Chloe Booth, Ellie McCoy, Michelle McManus, Zara Quigg

    [Hidden]