Dr Amanda Farrell

School of Justice Studies

I received my Ph.D. from Old Dominion University in Criminology and Criminal Justice, and I also hold a Master of Science in Investigative Psychology from the University of Liverpool, as well as a Master of Arts in Criminal Justice and Criminology from Sam Houston State University. Until I received the offer to join the LJMU policing faculty, I had been pursuing my third masters degree: Master of Arts in Clinical Mental Health Counseling as a part-time student at Marymount University, where I also graduated summa cum laude with my Bachelor of Arts degree as a Criminal Justice and Sociology double major way back in the day.

My experience in the criminal justice field is varied and started at an early age as a member of a first-responder family--predominantly a policing family, but we let the odd family member who chose to go into fire or EMS hang around still. As an undergraduate, I interned with the Metropolitan Police Service in London. During my MSc and PhD programs, I interned with a mid-sized police department, primarily in the detective division, specifically with field forensics. This internship spanned just over six years, with me working anywhere from eight to 60 hours per week with full scene access, dependent on agency needs and my teaching and class schedules. Yes, I was a full time doctoral student (PhD programmes are taught and typically take three to seven years in the US), teaching full time after my first two years in the PhD programme, and working for free with the PD. I have worked many crime scenes with forensic personnel and other investigators, informally and formally consulted on several homicide investigations in various jurisdictions across the United States, assisted with instruction at both the police academy and in-service training, and have been a guest lecturer on practitioner partnerships to research stress and trauma at the FBI's National Academy. I have also been Crisis Intervention Team (CIT) trained and have completed the three ICISF courses recommended for peer support and basic Critical Incident Stress Management (CISM) teams. During the last year of my doctorate, I was an ORISE research fellow for the FBI assigned to the Behavioral Analysis Units (BAUs) under the Critical Incident Response Group (CIRG) at the National Center for the Analysis of Violent Crime (NCAVC), where I worked on projects related to abducted and murdered children, violent crimes against adults, and mass shooting/mass casualty incidents.

Until August 2021, I was a tenured associate professor of Criminal Justice at Marymount University in Arlington, Virginia, where I also served the university community as the IRB (aka Ethics Board) chair, and worked with the Criminal Justice Living Learning Community (CJLLC), a partnership between the Criminal Justice Department and the Office of Campus Residential Services (OCRS). To the larger community, I have consulted with several police and criminal justice-related agencies on topics related to investigations, stress, and resilience, as well as serving as a researcher and/or consultant on several Department of Justice projects, which includes serving as a consultant and the technical writer for the Department of Justice working on the Needs Assessment of Forensic Laboratories and Medical Examiner and Coroners Offices (2019). I have delivered several requested presentations and trainings on a variety of topics. I have also provided editorial assistance for the Journal of Juvenile Justice, currently serve on the editorial board for the journal Psychology of Men and Masculinities, and review for several other academic publications.

Why do I get to teach about the things that I do? Because it is fascinating and I have had the privilege of not only working numerous homicide scenes, consulting on cases, and working for the BAU as a research fellow, but I have studied and trained under some of the greats: Dr. Bob Keppel, Mr. Richard Walter, Professor Laurence Alison, etc. I am lucky enough to have been given the opportunity to research and publish on female serial murderers--who are always a favorite topic to discuss.

My research and teaching interests include homicide, criminal investigations, field forensics, human sexuality, policing, and stress, trauma and resilience in the first responder community. My recent work demonstrates expanded interest in stress/trauma and resilience, particularly with regard to more broad investigative contexts and to the forensic science workforce. In addition to contributing to two FBI publications, my work can be found in Psychology of Men and Masculinities; Police Practice and Research: An International Journal; Gender Issues; the Journal of Investigative Psychology and Offender Profiling; Homicide Studies; and International Criminal Justice Review. I have written a chapter on the law enforcement perspective on mass shooting events in Jacklyn Schildkraut's edited text, Mass Shootings in America: Understanding the Debates, Causes, and Responses, and have both run and co-taught four pre-conference workshops for the American Academy of Forensic Sciences (AAFS), including a half day on stress, trauma and resilience in 2019 and a full day on the same topic in 2020, as well as delivered training on stress, trauma and resilience for the Masters 18 Death Investigators Conference, the Nevada State Death Investigators Conference, the Maryland State Police, and the Houston Forensic Science Center.

Degrees

2014, Old Dominion University, United States, Ph.D.
2008, University of Liverpool, United Kingdom, MSc
2006, Sam Houston State University, United States, MA
2003, Marymount University, United States, BA

Academic appointments

Senior Lecturer, Liverpool Centre for Advanced Policing Studies, Liverpool John Moores University, 2021 - present
Associate Professor, Criminal Justice, Marymount University, 2020 - 2021
Assistant Professor, Criminal Justice, Marymount University, 2014 - 2020

Internet publication

Farrell A, Ainger T. 2020. Self-care: Evidence-based strategies to cope with stress and trauma, especially in a global pandemic Publisher Url Public Url

Journal article

Farrell AL, Monk-Turner E, Scallon CJA. 2020. Utilizing Goffman’s concepts of impression management and stigma in understanding the aftermath of officer-involved shootings: Exploring the intersection with masculinity. Psychology of Men and Masculinity, 21 :392-400 DOI

Farrell AL, Monk-Turner E. 2019. Placing police shootings in context and implications for evidence based policy: an exploration and descriptive analysis of these incidents in the Hampton Roads region of Virginia from 1990–2010 Police Practice and Research, 20 :444-459 DOI

Farrell AL, Monk-Turner E, Danner MJE, Scallon CJA. 2018. “There’s No Crying in Police Work:” Exploring Police Shootings with Feminist Methods Gender Issues, 35 :220-235 DOI

Farrell AL, Keppel RD, Titterington VB. 2013. Testing Existing Classifications of Serial Murder Considering Gender: An Exploratory Analysis of Solo Female Serial Murderers JOURNAL OF INVESTIGATIVE PSYCHOLOGY AND OFFENDER PROFILING, 10 :268-288 DOI Author Url

Farrell AL, Keppel RD, Titterington VB. 2011. Lethal Ladies: Revisiting What We Know About Female Serial Murderers HOMICIDE STUDIES, 15 :228-252 DOI Author Url

Collins VE, Farrell AL, McKee JR, Martin FA, Monk-Turner E. 2011. The state of coverage: The media's representation of international issues and state crime International Criminal Justice Review, 21 :5-21 DOI

Chapters

Farrell A. 2018. Issues and Challenges for Law Enforcement Responding to Mass Shootings Schildkraut J. Mass Shootings in America: Understanding the Debates, Causes, and Responses ABC-CLIO 9781440856259 Publisher Url

Farrell A. 2007. ABC Home Health Services (Medicare Fraud) Gerber J, Jensen EL. Encyclopedia of White-collar Crime Greenwood 9780313335242

Report

Farrell A. 2002. Small Business Crime in London: An Independent Literature Review and Research Project Small Business Crime in London: An Independent Literature Review and Research Project

Thesis/Dissertation

Farrell A. Exploring police shootings and officer survivability: A case study Monk-Turner E, Danner M, Jarvis J.

Farrell A. Lethal ladies: A qualitative analysis of selected cases of female serial murderers in the United States to examine Kelleher and Kelleher’s classification system Titterington V, Keppel R, Roth M.

Conference presentation:

“’What’s she doing here?!’: Negotiating identity and harassment in gendered, sexualized, and “taboo” research spaces.”, Annual Meeting of the American Society of Criminology, Chicago, IL, Oral presentation. 2021

Examining the Impact of Trauma and Stress across Forensic and Investigative Contexts: A Tale of a Developing Research Agenda., Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Forensic Sciences, Anaheim, CA, Oral presentation. 2020

Exploring Kink, Consent, and Stigma, Exploring Kink, Consent, and Stigma, Annual Meeting of the American Society of Criminology, Oral presentation. 2019

What Students Write Well: Using Criminal Justice Majors’ Strengths to Improve their Writing, Annual Meeting of the American Society of Criminology, San Francisco, CA, Oral presentation. 2019

A Tale of Two Cities: Testing Ecological Theories of Police Shootings on a Small Scale, the Annual Meeting of the Homicide Research Working Group, San Antonio, TX, Oral presentation.

Best Practices and Lessons Learned from Short- term Faculty Led Study Abroad in Criminal Justice, Annual Meeting of the Academy of Criminal Justice Sciences, Baltimore, MD, Oral presentation.

Casualties of the drug war, Annual Meeting of the American Society of Criminology, Washington, D.C., Oral presentation.

Finding Feminist Methods in the Most Masculine of Places – Police Shootings: We’ve Come a Long Way…Maybe?, Annual Meeting of the American Society of Criminology, Atlanta, GA, Oral presentation.

It’s not just happening here, right?, Annual Meeting of the American Society of Criminology, Chicago, IL, Oral presentation.

Lethal ladies: Exploring the empirical validity of broad classification based on victim approach, Annual Meeting of the Homicide Research Working Group, New Orleans, LA, Oral presentation.

Multiple Sharp Force Injury Suicides: Common Features and Suggestions for Differentiation from Homicide Cases, Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Forensic Sciences, Seattle, WA, Oral presentation.

Norfolk as a Symbolic City a la Skolnick?, Annual Meeting of the Homicide Research Working Group, Chicago, IL, Oral presentation.

Partnerships, Policy and Practice: Working Together to Address Police Shootings in Norfolk, VA, Annual Meeting of the Homicide Research Working Group, Brunswick, GA, Oral presentation.

Placing police shootings in context: An exploration of these incidents in the Hampton Roads region from 1990-2010, Annual Meeting of the Academy of Criminal Justice Sciences, New York, NY, Oral presentation.

Police Officer Knowledge of Stress and Mental Health Services Offered by Their Agency, Annual Meeting of the Academy of Criminal Justice Sciences, Baltimore, MD, Oral presentation.

Research at a Crossroads: Understanding the dynamic relationships of culture, stigma and stress in policing, Annual Meeting of the American Society of Criminology, San Francisco, CA, Oral presentation.

The Effects of Career Policing on an Officer’s Family, Annual Meeting of the Academy of Criminal Justice Sciences, Baltimore, MD, Oral presentation.

Trauma, Cognition and the Investigators, Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Forensic Sciences, Seattle, WA, Oral presentation.

Using Study Abroad Experiences to Enhance Criminal Justice Curriculum, Annual Meeting of the American Society of Criminology, Philadelphia, PA, Oral presentation.

What do you MEAN writing is important in Criminal Justice?!?, Annual Meeting of the American Society of Criminology, New Orleans, LA, Oral presentation.

Other invited event:

Panelist on Vicarious Trauma and Burnout in Forensic Science. American Society of Crime Laboratory Directors (ASCLD) Lightning Talks series, Via Zoom, Invited by NIST to serve as a panelist on their lightning talks series.. 2021

Recognizing stress and its impacts in (and across) the forensic laboratory. In-service training presented for the Maryland State Police Forensic Scie, Via Zoom, As part of a research collaboration, this invited training covered preliminary data analysis of the survey administered with this division in the Fall of 2020, as well as introducing personnel to resources and some resilience training.. 2021

Recognizing stress and its impacts in (and across) the forensic laboratory for supervisors. In-service training presented for the Maryland State Poli, Via Zoom, As part of a research collaboration, this invited training covered preliminary data analysis of the survey administered with this division in the Fall of 2020, as well as introducing personnel to resources and some resilience training. There was a focus on stress recognition in subordinates and seeking help for those you supervise.. 2021

Death is our business: Stress, trauma and resilience for death investigation professionals. Workshop presented for the Nevada Conference on Basic Dea, Via Zoom, A stress recognition and resilience training/workshop was delivered at the request of conference organizers.. 2020

Stress, trauma and resilience in the HFSC workforce.” Workshop invited and presented at the Houston Forensic Science Center, Houston, TX, Workshop team was invited by HFSC to provide stress recognition and resilience training to its workforce.. 2020

“When the death and trauma we see at work follows us home: Recognizing the impact of trauma on forensic professionals and taking steps to mitigate it, St. Louis, MO, Invited by conference organizers to deliver a workshop on stress recognition and resilience.. 2019

“Stress, Trauma and the Forensic Workforce: Taking Steps to Recognize and Address the Issues.” Workshop invited and presented for the Annual Meeting, Morgantown, WV, Invited by conference organizers to present a workshop on stress recognition and resilience,. 2019

Media Coverage:

https://marymount.edu/blog/personal-connection-leads-marymount-professor-to-research-stress-and-trauma-in-first-responders/, Personal connection leads MU professor to research stress and trauma in first responders. 2021

Panelist on “The Science Side of Trauma: A Tough Conversation.” Tough Conversations web series by Trauma Behind the Badge.. 2021

https://www.discovermagazine.com/mind/female-serial-killers-exist-but-their-motives-are-different, Female Serial Killers Exist, but Their Motives Are Different: Male perpetrators may get more press, but they don’t have a monopoly on serial murder. 2020

Panelist on “PTSI for the Holidays: A Tough Conversation.” Tough Conversations web series by Trauma Behind the Badge.. 2020

Panelist on “CSI: A Tough Conversation.” Tough Conversations web series by Trauma Behind the Badge.. 2020

Panelist on “Family Behind the Badge: A Tough Conversation with the Families of First Responders and Veterans.” Tough Conversations web series by Trauma Behind the Badge.. 2020

https://marymount.edu/blog/effectively-preparing-students-for-careers-in-investigations/, Effectively Preparing Students for Careers in Investigations. 2020

https://marymount.edu/blog/marymount-students-learn-about-crime-investigation-in-england/, Marymount Students Learn About Crime Investigation in England. 2017

Editorial boards:

Psychology of Men and Masculinities, Consulting Editor. 2021

Other Professional Activity:

Farrell, A.L., Bethard, J., Ainger, T., & Katz, D. (2020). “Working towards a wellness mindset for forensic and investigative personnel: Addressing stress and trauma in the workforce and taking steps to change agency and professional culture.” Full day pre-conference workshop presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Forensic Sciences, Anaheim, CA.. 2020

Farrell, A.L., Ainger, T., Scallon, C.J.A., & Huffman, L. (2019). “What’s trauma and stress got to do with it? Recognizing the impact of trauma on forensic professionals and taking steps to mitigate it.” Half day workshop presented for the Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Forensic Sciences. Baltimore, MD..

Scherer, J.A., Farrell, A.L., Ainger, T., Jarvis, J., & Scallon, C.J.A. (2019). “Increasing and Maintaining the Resiliency of Forensic and Investigative Personnel.” Roundtable presented for the Annual Meeting of the American Society of Criminology. San Francisco, CA..

Walter, R., Neudecker, K. Zirpoli, P., Farrell, A.L. and Huffman, L. (2016). “Crime Assessment: Solving Crime beyond Profiling.” Eight hour pre-conference workshop presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Forensic Sciences, Las Vegas, NV..

Walter, R., Neudecker, K., Zirpoli, P., Farrell, A.L., and Huffman, L. (2015). “Sadism: Distinguishing between Criminal Behavior and Offender Analysis.” Eight hour pre-conference workshop presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Forensic Sciences, Orlando, FL..

Award:

School of Sciences, Mathematics and Education Scholarship Award, Marymount University's School of Sciences, Mathematics and Education. 2019

School of Education and Human Services Teacher of the Year, Marymount University's School of Education and Human Services. 2016

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