Activities

Projects

Research Institute for Literature and Cultural History

Research projects

A key feature of English activity has been the expansion of ambitious and large-scale research projects and their articulation through public engagement activities. 

Take a look at our project highlights and view our publications.

War Widows' Stories

War Widow's quilt

War Widows’ Stories raises awareness of the lives of war's forgotten women past and present through an innovative combination of oral history, participatory art and poetry, scholarly research, and public events. Led by Dr Nadine Muller (PI) and Dr Melanie Bassett (RA), the project works together with war widows and their families and is a collaboration between LJMU, the War Widows’ Association of Great Britain, Royal Museums Greenwich, the National Memorial Arboretum, the Imperial War Museums, and arts organisation arthur+martha.

Funding: Arts and Humanities Research Council (Early-Career Leadership Fellowship), Arts Council England, British Academy (Rising Star Engagement Award) and Heritage Lottery (Sharing Heritage Award).

Find out more about the project on the War Widows' Stories website.

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Writing Lives

Collaborative research project on working-class autobiography.

Visit the Writing Lives website.

Soundscapes in the Early Modern World

Soundscapes

‘Soundscapes in the Early Modern World’ is an AHRC-funded international research network working on the period from c. 1500-1800 to develop new approaches to uncovering the sounds of the early modern world. Our focus is on how sonic interaction shapes early modern identities. From the chiming of the clock regulating the daily patterns of the city, to the bell calling all to church, the street singer, and the literate reading pamphlets to the illiterate, sounds governed everyday life. The network explores how sounds create communities, civil society, sociability and ways of knowing and understanding the wider world and the self.

Find out more on the Early Modern Soundscapes website or follow us on Twitter @emsoundscapes.